Safe in Mosul after liberation?

11

Jul 2017

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Now that the Iraqi Government Forces have cleared the majority of Mosul, will it be safe for companies to enter Iraq?

Progress has been made to remove Da’esh from key locations in northern Iraq and to liberate the Iraqi population from the stranglehold that they had on them. However, now there is a major task ahead for the Iraqi government to rebuild and reconstruct areas of residential and commercial properties, key infrastructure and life supporting water and electricity.

Roads, bridges, the airport, the university and the railway station were all destroyed in the fight to remove the militants. It will take years and billions of dollars of investment to rebuild, not just Mosul, but the whole Nineveh region that has been affected by the fighting.

The first focus will be on restoring security, water, electricity and fuel, and on building homes for the return of those displaced by the war. The number of displaced people is enormous and is added to those displaced during the liberation of Anbar.

With budgets already stretched and the oil price still low, investment will surely be required from foreign governments and companies, international aid agencies and the United Nations. The UN has already been working hard to get power and fresh water into those homes still standing so that families can return and start rebuilding their lives. Stabilisation is now the major effort for the international community.

Though the fight with Da’esh may have come to an end in Mosul, Da’esh will continue like a hydra. It has not gone away, how, where and when it will reappear is the big question; but reappear it will. The requirement to ensure the safety of you, your personnel and assets while working in Iraq will remain for some time to come.

Managing your risk through careful assessment, intelligent report analysis and ground truth is key to mitigate dangerous situations. For us, it is business as usual in Baghdad and Basra.  That means serving to protect our clients while they get on with their day-to-day business that is the major contribution to the economy of Iraq and the stabilisation of the country.

*Image source independent.co.uk